Perceived Discrimination, Intergenerational Family Conflicts, and Depressive Symptoms in Foreign-Born and U.S.-Born Asian American Emerging Adults

Hsiu-Lan Cheng, first author of the AAJP June 2015 issue’s feature article

Hsiu-Lan Cheng, first author of the AAJP June 2015 issue’s feature article

Asian American Journal of Psychology, Vol 6 No 2, (June 2015) Feature Article:Perceived Discrimination, Intergenerational Family Conflicts, and Depressive Symptoms in Foreign-Born and U.S.-Born Asian American Emerging Adults by Hsiu-Lan Cheng (New Mexico State University), Shu-Ping Lin (Tamkang University, New Taipei City, Taiwan) & Chu Hui Cha (New Mexico State University)

Do you think your perspective or experiences of being racially discriminated are different from those of your family members, particularly those from a different generation? Has such difference ever led to disagreement or conflicts? How do you think these types of experience, either of being discriminated or in conflicts with your family, affect your mental health? As the sociocultural and political conversations on racial discrimination rage on in America in 2015, one does not have to look far to discover the long and elaborate streams of literature detailing the negative psychological consequences of discrimination. Against this backdrop, Cheng, Lin, and Cha (2015) extend these streams in the current June 2015 issue of the Asian American Journal of Psychology. Cheng and colleagues broaden our knowledge on the mechanisms through which discrimination negatively impacts mental health among Asian American and immigrant college students. Recognizing the interrelated and dynamic nature of contextual factors at various levels, Dr. Cheng and her colleagues cleverly hypothesize family conflict as a mediation between discrimination and depressive symptoms.


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