Dr. Andrés Pérez-Rojas

 Andres Perez-Rojas

Dr. Andrés Pérez-Rojas

Assistant Professor

Counseling & Educational Psychology

(575) 646-6496
andrespr@nmsu.edu

Perez-Rojas CV

Culture, Psychotherapy, and Mental Health Research Team Website

 

Dr. Andrés Pérez-Rojas received his M.S. and doctorate in counseling psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. His research interests include psychotherapy process and outcome, with particular emphases on the therapeutic relationship, therapist effects, training and supervision, and college student mental health. He is also interested in various aspects of culture and multiculturalism, particularly on topics related to language and bilingualism, acculturation, Latino/a mental health, and the role of culture in psychotherapy. Through theoretical and empirical scholarship, Dr. Pérez-Rojas strives to advance knowledge of what makes psychotherapy work, and the cultural factors that hinder and/or enrich the psychotherapy experience for multilingual and culturally diverse people.

Dr. Pérez-Rojas has also conducted individual and group counseling and psychotherapy over the course of his career. His approach to treatment combines elements of relational psychodynamic, humanistic/experiential, and cognitive-behavioral approaches.

 

Recent Publications

Bartholomew, T. T., Perez-Rojas, A. E., Lockard, A. J., & Locke, B. D. (in press). “Research

doesn’t fit in a 50-minute hour”: The phenomenology of therapists’ involvement in research at a university counseling center. Counseling Psychology Quarterly. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09515070.2016.1275525

Perez-Rojas, A. E., Lockard, A. J., Bartholomew, T. T., Janis, R. A., Carney, D. M., Xiao, H., … Hayes, J. A. (in press). Presenting concerns in counseling centers: The view from clinicians on the ground. Psychological Services.

Gelso, C. J., & Pérez-Rojas, A. E. (in press). Inner experience and the good psychotherapist. In L.G. Castonguay & C.E. Hill (Eds.), Therapist effects: Toward understanding how and why some therapists are better than others. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.